Monday, February 13, 2012

ORIGINS blogfest

Before I started to write, I started to create worlds.
I was the boss of a realm beyond the clouds. You could travel there on sunrays that were connecting it to earth, I call them sky-stairs. Or you could use one of my space-ships. And in case there were no clouds in the sky, it was hidden and only those familiar with it could go there (like me).

The first writing-success I remember was in primary school. It must have been on of the first stories we were supposed to write, because I had not planned to put much effort into it yet. However, I was praised for it, especially for a certain phrase I used: "He waited in the shadow of the door."
Although I still think I stole that line from somewhere, I started to like the idea of writing stories.

My memory is bad, but I know I tried to tell several stories via pictures during the next few years, the written words did come later (with some exceptions that turn up now and then in old notebooks).
I liked to put together little magazines, which only readers would be my mother and the friend with whom I worked on them.

Then were were some years of fanfiction for ElfQuest fan-clubs, called holts. This might have been my first English stories, too.

The brainstorming and single scenes for my very first big fantasy-epos were in german. Books like those of David Eddings inspired me. Till this day it is still untiteled and of course unfinished.
It shares that second characteristic with all of my other stories, which I usually started during the last few NaNoWriMos or as fanfiction.
Most of my stories are in English now, because I discovered my love for that language some years ago.


This is my contribution to DL Hammons' ORIGINS blogfest, which he started so that writers could share a bit of their past and motivation with others. Take a look at his link-list, if you are interested in more origin-stories.


This entry is cross-posted with my general-blog.

14 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for sharing your origins story! Funny how many writers find a love for creating stories at a young age.

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    1. How nice of you to stop by! I really can't imagine how my childhood would have been without making up stories.

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  2. I used to do zines too back in the 90s. Lots of fun! I never did fan fiction, although a lot of great authors got their start that way.

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    1. Well, fanfiction is an easy start, you can use a world you already know and like, and if you want even the characters that are already around :)

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  3. Creating worlds and then the stories to fill them up. Interesting concept. Nice to meet you. I'll be back.

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    1. Oh, I wish I still were able to create good worlds. That would probably help me writing my stories a lot.

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  4. OMG, I loooooved ElfQuest! I've been waiting most of my life for the movie to come out. I watched the fan faux trailer last year and thought it was wonderfully done. It's got to be made someday. Maybe it's better it's taken so long, so the effects will be even more realistic. One of my daughters has inherited my appreciation for it. I'm glad you stuck with your instinct to write ;)

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    1. Yes, that trailer was amazing ... although I'm not sure a whole movie in that style would have been a good ElfQuest-movie. On the other hand, such a movie might be better than none at all.

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  5. Another Fan Fiction success story. I've read quite a few of those over the last couple days. Good for you! Thank you for sharing your ORIGIN with us. :)

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    1. I guess it's an easy way to start and you can play with something you love.
      Thank you for starting this blogfest!

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  6. I think all writers started in childhood (even if they cannot remember it.) After all, what is an imaginary friend if not writing dialogue and adventures ala CALVIN & HOBBES? Love your origin story, Roland

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    1. I'm not sure if every writer had imaginary friends, but I guess they should :)

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  7. Funny how most of us start out at a young age. Our imagination sure propels us into the world of writing.
    Great to meet you on this blogfest.

    your newest follower,
    Nutschell
    www.thewritingnut.com

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    1. Thank you for following me :)
      Propels is quite the right word for it ... at one point the imagination in your head becomes just too much and has to be caught with the written word.

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